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Do Co Mo


We have already talked about using translation apps whilst travelling or being lost in translation, for example in the Chinese language. An interesting development has however recently emerged in the mobile app world for the Japanese language: and is geared towards finding a decent place to eat on your travels.

DoCoMo, a Japanese mobile communications operator, has developed an app called “menu translation”, which, as the name suggests, translates menus from Japanese into English, Chinese (both Madarin and Cantonese)and Korean.

It’s a very useful tool to help tourists explore the wonders of Japan; they only need to use their smartphones to take a picture and the app will show the English translation. There’s even an option to get extra information via Wikipedia if the user wants to know more about a particular term. The app is unfortunately unavailable for the iPhone but has been published on the Android market.

Being lost in translation is not a nice feeling, especially if you are trying to conduct business. To play safe, ask SanTranslate.


We have already talked about using translation apps whilst travelling or being lost in translation, for example in the Chinese language. An interesting development has however recently emerged in the mobile app world for the Japanese language: and is geared towards finding a decent place to eat on your travels.

DoCoMo, a Japanese mobile communications operator, has developed an app called “menu translation”, which, as the name suggests, translates menus from Japanese into English, Chinese (both Madarin and Cantonese)and Korean.

It’s a very useful tool to help tourists explore the wonders of Japan; they need only use their smartphones to take a picture and the app will show the English translation. There’s even an option to get extra information via Wikipedia if the user wants to know more about a particular term. The app is unfortunately unavailable for the iPhone but has been published on the Android market.

Being lost in translation is not a nice feeling, especially if you are trying to conduct business. To play it safe, ask SanTranslate.

By | October 11th, 2011|Blog|0 Comments

Google Internet Bus


Have you ever thought how different your life be without the internet? In this day and age, the internet is so deeply intertwined with our everyday life that it can be difficult to imagine how to do without it! How could we work in the office without an internet connection? Or keep in touch with family and friends without Facebook and Skype? From cloud computing to online shopping our welfare and access to a huge virtual world of information and opportunities is possible thanks to the internet.

It’s important to remember however that it’s not the same everywhere. Internet users in India make up roughly 8% of the population, or just under 100m people, which led to Google in 3 February, 2009, starting a project to widen internet penetration in India. The Google Internet bus is a free, mobile cybercafé dreamed up by the search giant and run in association with BSNL, a large state-owned internet service provider (ISP). Until now it has covered over 43,000km and passed through 120 towns in 11 states. Google estimates that 1.6m people have been offered their first online experience as a result. Of those, 100,000 have signed up for an internet connection of their own. Google expects the number of users in India to triple over the next three years.

The reasons generally cited for India’s low internet penetration rate are expense, a poor infrastructure and meagre local content but this situation is being improved: BSNL already offers limited-use broadband for as little as $5 a month. Third-generation mobile networks are also getting better and are making data services available to Indians, crazy about mobile phones. As for content, the Hindi Wikipedia website recently passed a landmark 100,000 entries.

It is in fact a very important issue that Indians access information in Hindi, their native language as this way, they are able to make the most of their new internet experience. If you need a website translation service provider, SanTranslate is happy to help you!

By | October 10th, 2011|Blog|0 Comments

The Wheatstone project


The need for oil and other energy sources is growing dramatically, with worldwide energy consumption projected to increase by 36 percent by 2035. The growing demand is fueled by a population that is predicted to increase by 25 percent in the next 20 years, with most of that growth in countries with emerging economies such as China and India. Rising energy demands from economic output and improved standards of living will likely put added pressure on energy supplies; in China alone, demand is expected to increase by 75 percent by 2035.

On the 30th of September 2011 Chevron, one of the world’s leading integrated energy companies, sanctioned the $29 billion Wheatstone project in the Western Australian Pilbara region just days after the Australian federal government granted environmental approval. The Wheatstone project includes a two-train liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant with a foundation capacity of 8.9 million metric tonnes per year and a 190 million-standard-cubic-feet-per-day gas processing plant, based at the Ashburton North Gas Hub.

The Wheatstone onshore foundation project is a joint venture between the Australian subsidiaries of Chevron (operating 73.6%), Apache (13%), the Kuwait Foreign Petroleum Exploration Company (KUFPEC 7%) and Shell(6.4%).

George Kirkland, vice chairman of the Chevron Corporation said, “Wheatstone will be a strong pillar of the Australian economy for decades. We have achieved this important milestone with the close support and cooperation of the Australian federal, state and local governments along with the local community, our partners and customers.”

Using energy more efficiently is of vital importance to secure the future of the planet, as well as helping developing countries’ economies take off.

By | October 7th, 2011|Blog|0 Comments
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