Golf boom in China – at home and abroad

golf in chinaSanTranslate has just completed the English to Chinese translation of a brochure for a new golf resort in Yunnan, China for an Australian company expanding there.

Golf has taken off in a big way amongst China’s wealthy population with new links popping up all over China.  Banned until the mid 1980s for being too bourgeois, the sport is now enjoying a boom despite a ban on constructing new courses introduced in 2004.  Whilst it is a game for the wealthy, the addition of golf to the Olympic programme from 2014 has boosted recent growth in interest and the sport is already included in the Chinese National Games.

Golf is also an important attraction for tourists keen to play on world-class courses so we’re expecting to see more demand for translating marketing materials for the golf industry.

By | May 23rd, 2010|Blog|0 Comments

Intellectual Property and trading with China

More UK and European businesses are interested in getting their products manufactured in China. SanTranslate has recently been doing some translation for a client who wants to do just that. They’ve asked the Chinese supplier to sign a non-disclosure agreement (NDA).

China Law Blog recommends doing NDAs in both English and Chinese with the Chinese version being the official one. This removes any potential argument that the supplier didn’t understand what is was signing and will be readily understandable by any Chinese court should the need arise.

They also share the tip that presenting a potential supplier with an NDA before you disclose information gives you a good opportunity to test their reaction – if they don’t want to sign, do you want to do business with them?

When your business dealings move forward you may need to consider further protection of your IP. The UK’s Intellectual Property Office has this to say about IP issues when trading with China:

“The prevalent attitude of many overseas businessmen is that registering their intellectual property rights in China does little to protect their creativity and innovation.

However China has a well-developed intellectual property system which allows you to protect your IP as you would your physical property. It is well worth remembering that if you fail to make use of the system at the outset of your venture you could find real difficulties in enforcing your rights at a later date. (One should remember that the same is true for the UK!)

As in most developed countries in China it will sometimes not be possible to protect IP rights unless they have been officially applied for and officially acknowledged or granted. Nonetheless some IP protection in China takes place automatically. For example copyright protection exists without need for its registration and provided there is some form of verifiable record of what has been created.”

The IPO’s booklet, China: an Enforcement Roadmap, provides useful guidance on the Chinese Intellectual Property protection and enforcement system. See also their China IPR SME Helpdesk.

By | May 14th, 2010|Blog|0 Comments

Rail industry opportunities in China

In many ways, the rail sector in China still has a long way to develop despite the introduction of its first maglevsystem in 2004 and high-speed train services running since 2007.  It is economic development that is driving the need to grow China’s rail system even further and China’s central government is planning to spend $250 billion over the next ten years, laying nearly 16,000 miles of high-speed track.

There are, of course, constraints as well as opportunities for businesses operating throughout the globe.  UK Trade & Industry has a useful report on the Railway Sector in China and a team of railway sector specialists to advise you.

In this highly technical sector, it’s vital that any translation you require is accurate and technically competent which is why we are so selective about the specialists in technical translation that we choose to work with.  If you need any technical translation, please contact SanTranslateto discuss your needs.

By | May 10th, 2010|Blog|0 Comments
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