Translation for the automotive industry

We’ve noticed an increased interest in translation for the automotive industry, particularly in relation to China.  When you look at a few statistics, it’s not surprising. 

  • In 2009, China produced 13.79 million units, making it the top car producer that year;
  • China has 52 foreign and domestic car makers operating there – the US has 15;
  • Foreign cars account for 85% of the Chinese market;
  • The automotive sector is a key part of the themes for the Shanghai Expo in June 2010.

No wonder then, the companies in the automotive sector and supply chain are looking for more translation services. 

Automotive translation requires specialist technical translation expertise and a consistent approach.  We can assure automotive sector clients of the best of both aspects with our specially selected translators and our use of SDL Trados translation memory software to ensure consistent and accurate use of technical terminology.

By | May 4th, 2010|Blog|0 Comments

Loughborough College – English to Chinese translation for caterers

We’ve recently carried out a piece of translation into Simplifed Chinese to promote their new catering course.

 

The course is aimed at Chinese chefs and international students who wish to learn about British catering and hospitality etiquette so that they can take these skills back to China and apply them to the catering and hospitality industry there.

By | April 29th, 2010|Blog|0 Comments

Green credentials attract premium in Singapore

In some parts of the world the recession has had a detrimental effect on the green/organic market as consumers tighten their belts and let a few luxuries go.

But it seems that high-income shoppers in Singapore are still happy to pay a premium for sustainable eco-friendly products, according to a Reader’s Digest survey.  The survey also found that shoppers, younger consumers and women in particular, are more likely to trust a brand if it has been recommended by a friend.

Establishing trust, of course, is essential for any brand entering a new market and we’d strongly advocate for getting your use of language and branding right to create a solid foundation for building that trust.  Accurate translations that also reflect your brand values and are localised to the country you’re going into are essential to portray your brand favourably to new customers.

And you should also think about the subtleties of design – are you using colours that have a different connotation in the new market to your established ones?  This “Colours in Cultures” chart shows some of the different meanings associated with different colours by different cultures.  You can also boost your brand and avoid embarrassing gaffes by the judicious use of appropriate typesetting, particularly with complex languages such as Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Arabic.

By | April 28th, 2010|Blog|0 Comments
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